Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10773/21073
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dc.contributor.authorDeacon, Amy E.pt
dc.contributor.authorBarbosa, Miguelpt
dc.contributor.authorMagurran, Anne E.pt
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-11T12:39:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-11T12:39:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.issn1472-6785pt
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10773/21073-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) is a successful invasive species. It is also a species that mates multiply; previous studies have demonstrated that this strategy carries fitness benefits. Guppies are routinely introduced to tanks and troughs in regions outside their native range for mosquito-control purposes, and often spread beyond these initial confines into natural water bodies with negative ecological consequences. Here, using a mesocosm set up that resembles the containers into which single guppies are typically introduced for mosquito control, we ask whether singly-mated females are at a disadvantage, relative to multiply-mated females, when it comes to founding a population. Treatments were monitored for one year.\n\nRESULTS: A key finding was that mating history did not predict establishment success, which was 88% in both treatments. Furthermore, analysis of behavioural traits revealed that the descendants of singly-mated females retained antipredator behaviours, and that adult males showed no decrease in courtship vigour. Also, we detected no differences in behavioural variability between treatments.\n\nCONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that even when denied the option of multiple mating, singly-mated female guppies can produce viable populations, at least at the founder stage. This may prove to be a critical advantage in typical introduction scenarios where few individuals are released into enclosed water bodies before finding their way into natural ecosystems.pt
dc.language.isoengpt
dc.publisherBioMed Centralpt
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/SFRH/SFRH%2FBPD%2F82259%2F2011/PTpt
dc.rightsopenAccesspor
dc.subjectinvasive speciespt
dc.subjectmesocosmspt
dc.subjectpoecilia reticulatapt
dc.subjectpolyandrypt
dc.subjectpopulation viabilitypt
dc.titleForced monogamy in a multiply mating species does not impede colonisation successpt
dc.typearticle
dc.peerreviewedyespt
ua.distributioninternationalpt
degois.publication.firstPage1: 18pt
degois.publication.issue1
degois.publication.lastPage1: 18pt
degois.publication.titleBMC Ecologypt
degois.publication.volume14pt
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6785-14-18pt
Appears in Collections:CESAM - Artigos
DBio - Artigos
DBio - Artigos

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