Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10773/22933
Title: Halophyte plant colonization as a driver of the composition of bacterial communities in salt marshes chronically exposed to oil hydrocarbons
Author: Oliveira, Vanessa
Gomes, Newton C. M.
Cleary, Daniel F. R.
Almeida, Adelaide
Silva, Artur M. S.
Simões, Mário M. Q.
Silva, Helena
Cunha, Ângela
Keywords: Microbial diversity
Pyrosequencing
Rhizosphere
Salt marshes
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Wiley
Abstract: In this study, two molecular techniques [denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and barcoded pyrosequencing] were used to evaluate the composition of bacterial communities in salt marsh microhabitats [bulk sediment and sediment surrounding the roots (rhizosphere) of Halimione portulacoides and Sarcocornia perennis ssp. perennis] that have been differentially affected by oil hydrocarbon (OH) pollution. Both DGGE and pyrosequencing revealed that bacterial composition is structured by microhabitat. Rhizosphere sediment from both plant species revealed enrichment of operational taxonomic units closely related to Acidimicrobiales, Myxococcales and Sphingomonadales. The in silico metagenome analyses suggest that homologous genes related to OH degradation appeared to be more frequent in both plant rhizospheres than in bulk sediment. In summary, this study suggests that halophyte plant colonization is an important driver of hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial community composition in estuarine environments, which can be exploited for in situ phytoremediation of OH in salt marsh environments.
Peer review: yes
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10773/22933
DOI: 10.1111/1574-6941.12425
ISSN: 0168-6496
Appears in Collections:CESAM - Artigos
DBio - Artigos
DQ - Artigos
QOPNA - Artigos

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